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It Got Me Thinking . . .

Dennis L. Dossett
   (All Rights Reserved)


      It’s been a strange weather year in Seattle. We had the wettest winter on record—and the 4th wettest April on record—which led to a beautiful spring and early summer. The flowers have been outstanding so far this year, but now it is dry. A couple of years ago normally “rainy” Seattle set a record of 51 consecutive days without measurable rain. This year that record was shattered with .02” of rain on day 56. It hasn’t rained since, and now we are set to break the record of 62 consecutive days over 70 F. sometime next week with little or no cooling in sight. I’m not complaining; many places have much hotter and drier weather than Seattle, but this has certainly been an unusual weather year in many ways.

      The day our “official” dry streak ended, most of us near Seattle got only about sixteen drops of rain. I knew that it was just enough to get the dust on the freeway wet and slippery, but not wet enough to wash it off. Translation: I expected the morning commute to be slow and hazardous with many drivers darting in and out trying to make up for lost time on their way to work. I wasn’t disappointed.

      But before I got to the freeway, I pulled up to the first stoplight on my route and thought to myself, “I’m going to make this a good day.”

      “NO!” The shout from “my Guys” (my spirit guides) startled me. Then dead silence. I sat there at the red light waiting for more information, but all I finally got was a somewhat stern “Let’s try this again.”

      “Okay, . . .” I said to myself. Still dead silence. Obviously they were waiting for me. (Thinking: “Wow this is a long red light.”) “Okay, . . . I’m going to make this a great day.”

      “Hmmm. Better, but not quite what we had in mind. Let’s try this again.”

      (Thinking: “C’mon Guys, I’m no mind reader. How about a hint?”)

      “No, you figure it out. You already know this because you wrote about it in the book chapter you just finished. Now practice what you preach!”

      Dead silence. (Thinking: “Is this light ever going to change?”)

      “Yes, when you do.”

      (Thinking: “Well, I’ m not a mind reader but obviously they are. Let’s see, that chapter was a long one. What exactly are they referring to?”).

      After a very long silence, I finally remembered. “Okay, . . . It’s already a great day . . . and my job is to relax and allow it to unfold naturally, without trying to make it happen.”

      “YES!”

      The stoplight instantly turned green accompanied by a round of almost raucous laughter from “my Guys” over my denseness. They do make it a point to have a good time—often at my seeming expense—but I know it is all for my benefit, my soul evolution. I had taken the bait—hook, line, and sinker—and fallen into the old trap of habit, a deadly pitfall on the road to Conscious Living, the title of my book.

      But that’ s the whole point of Conscious Living, thoughtfully and purposefully creating your own reality rather than thoughtlessly bumbling along through a day created by whatever pops into your mind through habit and social conditioning. Your thoughts really do create your reality (and quantum physics demonstrates this beautifully), so I decided to spend the rest of my morning commute mindfully minding my thoughts regarding what I wanted to accomplish without fussing about how, when, and even whether it actually happened on “my schedule”. That last point—whether—has to do with detaching from the outcome, because the Universe always knows better than I do what is best for me. There are no accidents in my world.

      I really didn’t notice the next few stoplights before the freeway; I was lost in paying attention to traffic and my own thoughts. By the time I actually did get to the freeway, I realized just how right my suspicions had been. Traffic on the morning commute was a mess. But I decided to relax and allow the trip to unfold without tension and without reacting to the jerks (excuse me, “unenlightened motorists”) who were creating the major part of the traffic nightmare.

      I turned the car radio station from the morning news to a program called “Mid-day Jazz”. Easy listening and creative approaches to old standards brought a smile to my face. I liked it!

      I spent the next half hour in relaxed, defensive driving, nodding my head to the rhythm of the music and smiling at the beautiful new chord progressions the musicians chose to play. I drove, relaxed, and smiled. And the more I relaxed and smiled, the easier the commute became. By the time I realized that I needed to move over two lanes in the next half mile to make my intended exit, I was grinning from ear to ear and even chuckling now and then at the prospects of what the day might unfold before me. I wasn’t disappointed. I could even “hear” my “Guys” smiling at what was happening.

      The day turned out to be more than just great. It was about as fantastic as I could ever have hoped. I was able to help a couple of souls who were struggling with their lives, and I met two people who came in together as friends and who independently (over the next four days) decided to make an appointment with me for past-life counseling. I also was able to interest three other people in a series of classes I will be teaching this fall. I felt relaxed and at ease the entire day, and actually enjoyed some parts of it that I might ordinarily not have looked forward to experiencing. What more could one ask?

      Only one thing. On my drive home that evening (rush-hour traffic again) I relaxed, smiled, and thought about the day’s events. Then I realized that I had energetically created the entire day through my conscious intentions and then let it all go, allowing it to unfold without my constant meddling in the details. And that realization got me thinking . . . I thought about some very common problems that we all create for ourselves through unconscious living. And then I realized that I had just created the topic for next month’s blog without all the last minute struggle, drama, and tension I have so often experienced.

      Last night when I went to bed (way too late), I set my intention to create a topic and the content for this blog—four days before it is due. I relaxed and allowed my thoughts to drift into sleep. I awoke with a start as daylight approached, with a “knowing” of what I would write. My “creative work” done, I rolled over and finished getting the rest of my night’s sleep. When I arose this morning, that middle-of-the-night inspiration got me thinking again . . . I sat at my computer and then relaxed and allowed the writing to flow as it was given to me. And instead of agonizing over it as usual, I actually enjoyed the flow of ideas and words coming through my fingers; I liked it!

      I hope that sharing this little anecdote may also help to get you thinking . . . Until next month!